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Here’s How The Nation Responded When A Black Militia Group Occupied A Government Building February 28, 2018

Posted by rogerhollander in California, Gun Control/Violence, History, Race, Racism, Uncategorized.
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Roger’s note: Here, believe it or not, is a true story about  NRA supported Republican sponsored legislation on gun control.  It happened in my and maybe your lifetime; I remember it well.  I guess all things are relatives.  For Republicans and the NRA when oppressed people begin to arm themselves, that is another thing.  In other words, Black Panthers trump (no pun intended) the Second Amendment.  Getting back to the present, unless and until Blacks, Latinos, and Women begin to arm themselves en masse; it’s open season on assault gun sales.  Government tyranny must be addressed; and when the attack begins we will need those AK-15 to mow down as many as we can of those government soldiers, even though, of course, we support our troops.

Huffingtonpost, 01/06/2016 01:38 pm ET Updated Dec 21, 2016
Nearly 50 years ago, a group of armed Black Panthers entered the California state Capitol to protest a gun control bill.

When armed militants seized a government building in Burns, Oregon, on Saturday, stating their willingness to “kill and be killed” and promising to stay for “years,” the official response was cautious and restrained. Many onlookers wondered whether this would still be the case if the militants were people of color instead of white people.

If you’re not familiar with the history of protest in the U.S., you might not know that the armed occupation of government buildings hasn’t always been just for white guys. In fact, on May 2, 1967, a group of 30 Black Panthers walked into the California state Capitol building, toting rifles and shotguns and quickly garnering national headlines.

Just to be clear, there are a world of differences between the Black Panthers’ demonstration and what’s happening in Oregon now (although it is noteworthy that you have to go back to 1967 to find an example of black activists doing something even remotely analogous). The two groups employed different tactics, fought for different causes and — predictably — elicited different reactions in vastly different places and times. But the 1967 incident serves as one example of the way Americans tend to respond to black protest — which some say is always likely to be different from the way Americans react when it’s white people doing the protesting.

Members of the Black Panthers hold guns during the group’s protest at the California Assembly in May 1967.

In October 1966, Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale formed the Black Panther Party for Self Defense as a small community organization based in Oakland, California. Its members — including the 30 people who would travel to Sacramento the following May — believed that black Americans should exercise their constitutional right to defend themselves against an oppressive U.S. government. At the time, California lawmakers were trying to strip them of that right, and the Black Panthers wanted to tell the U.S., and the world, that they found this unacceptable.

Among other things, the Black Panthers’ agenda involved taking up arms and patrolling their communities to protect against rampant racism in policing. And that’s what they did in the first few months of the party’s existence, carrying guns openly in compliance with California law, driving around their neighborhoods, observing arrests and other law enforcement activity — effectively policing the police. Newton was even known for packing a law book alongside his rifle that he’d recite from when informing an officer that a civilian’s rights were being violated.

The patrols weren’t meant to encourage violence. The Panthers were committed to using force only if it was used against them, and at first, their mere presence appeared to be working as a check on abusive policing. But the Panthers’ willful assertion of their rights — like the day Newton reportedly stood up to a cop in front of a crowd of black onlookers — was unacceptable to white authority figures who’d come to expect complete deference from black communities, and who were happy to use fear and force to extract it.

Don Mulford, a GOP assemblyman who represented Oakland, responded to the Black Panther police patrols in 1967 with a bill to strip Californians of the right to openly carry firearms.

Nobody tried to stop the 30 Black Panthers — 24 men and six women, carrying rifles, shotguns and revolvers — as they walked through the doors of the state Capitol building on May 2 of that year. This was decades before Sept. 11 or the Oklahoma City bombing, and the protesters were, after all, legally allowed to have their weapons. They entered with their guns pointed at the ceiling. Behind them followed a horde of journalists they’d called to document the protest.

As the rest of the group waited nearby, six Panthers entered the assembly chamber, where they found lawmakers mid-session. Some legislators reportedly saw the protesters and took cover under desks. It was the last straw: Police finally ordered the protesters to leave the premises. The group maintained they were within their rights to be in the Capitol with their guns, but eventually they exited peacefully.

Outside, Seale delivered the Black Panther executive mandate before a crush of reporters. This section of remarks, reprinted in Hugh Pearson’s The Shadow of the Pantherstill resonates today:

“Black people have begged, prayed, petitioned, demonstrated, and everything else to get the racist power structure of America to right the wrongs which have historically been perpetuated against black people. All of these efforts have been answered by more repression, deceit and hypocrisy. As the aggression of the racist American government escalates in Vietnam, the police agencies of America escalate the oppression of black people throughout the ghettoes of America. Vicious police dogs, cattle prods, and increased patrols have become familiar sights in black communities. City Hall turns a deaf ear to the pleas of black people for relief from this increasing terror.”

Shortly after Seale finished, police arrested the group on felony charges of conspiracy to disrupt a legislative session. Seale accused them of manufacturing “trumped up charges,” but the protesters would later plead guilty to lesser misdemeanors.

Mulford’s legislation, which became known as the “Panthers Bill,” passed with the support of the National Rifle Association, which apparently believed that the whole “good guy with a gun” thing didn’t apply to black people. California Gov. Ronald Reagan (R), who would later campaign for president as a steadfast defender of the Second Amendment, signed the bill into law.

Although the May 2 demonstration failed to sway lawmakers into voting against the Mulford Act — and may have even convinced some of them that such a measure was necessary — it did succeed in making the Black Panthers front-page news. Headlines ran above evocative photos of armed black protesters, many wearing berets, bomber jackets and dark sunglasses, walking the halls of the California Capitol. And the American public’s response to that imagery reflected a nation deeply divided on the issue of race.

On one hand, such a defiant demonstration of black power served as recruitment fodder for the Black Panther Party, which had previously only been operating in the Bay Area. It grew in size and influence, opening branches in a number of major cities, building a presence on college campuses and ultimately surging to as many as 5,000 members across 49 local chapters in 1969.

The party even attracted a number of radical-leaning white supporters — many of whom were moved by the Black Panthers’ lesser-remembered efforts, like free breakfasts for children in black neighborhoods, drug and alcohol abuse awareness courses, community health and consumer classes and a variety of other programs focused on the health and wellness of their communities.

But it was clear from the moment the Black Panthers stepped inside the California Capitol that the nuances of the protest, and of Seale’s message, weren’t going to be understood by much of white America. The local media’s initial portrayal of the brief occupation as an “invasion” would lay the groundwork for the enduring narrative of the Black Panthers first and foremost as a militant anti-white movement.

The front page of The Sacramento Bee on the night of the protest.

In August 1967, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover took steps to ensure that public support for the Black Panthers would remain marginal. In a memorandum just months after the armed protest, he deemed the group a “black nationalist, hate-type organization“ to be neutralized by COINTELPRO, a controversial initiative that notoriously skirted the law in its attempts to subvert any movement that Hoover saw as a potential source of civil disorder. A 2012 report further uncovered the extent of the agency’s activity, revealing that an FBI informant had actually provided the Black Panthers with weapons and training as early as 1967.

As the Panthers’ profile grew in the months and years following the California Capitol protest, so too did their troubles — something that many of the Panthers themselves regarded as no coincidence. Just two months after Hoover put the Black Panthers in his sights, Newton was arrested and convicted of killing Oakland police officer John Frey, a hotly contested development and the first in a series of major, nationwide controversies that engulfed the movement. (Newton ultimately served two years of his sentence before his conviction was overturned in a set of appeals.)

The strength of the Black Panthers ebbed and flowed in the years leading up to the organization’s dissolution in 1982. The party struggled to find a balance between its well-intentioned community efforts and its reliance on firepower and occasional violence to bolster its hardened image. High-profile shootouts with police and arrests of members created further rifts in the group’s leadership and helped cement the white establishment’s depiction of Black Panthers as extremists.

Many white Americans couldn’t get over their first impression of the Black Panthers. Coverage of the 1967 protest introduced them to the party, and the fear of black people exercising their rights in an empowered, intimidating fashion left its mark. To them, the Black Panthers were little more than a group of thugs unified behind militaristic trappings and a leftist political ideology. And to be fair, some members of the party were criminals not just in the minds of frightened white people.

The Black Panther protest in 1967 is not the “black version” of what’s happening in Oregon right now. Those demonstrators entered the state Capitol lawfully, lodged their complaints against a piece of racially motivated legislation and then left without incident. But for those who see racial double standards at play in Oregon, the scope and severity of the 1967 response — the way the Panthers’ demonstration brought about panicked headlines, a prolonged FBI sabotage effort and support for gun control from the NRA, of all groups — will serve as confirmation that race shapes the way the country reacts to protest.


This article has been updated to specify that one has to go as far back as 1967 to find black activists — rather than any activists of color at all — participating in a protest similar to the Oregon occupation.


High School Students Lead Protest Against Gun Violence In Front Of White House February 19, 2018

Posted by rogerhollander in Arms, Gun Control/Violence, Uncategorized, Youth.
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Roger’s note: Youth have always been at the head of social and revolutionary change.  I wonder if they are aware of the antecedent for the cheer: “Hey, hey, NRA, how many kids did you kill today?”  Substitute LBJ for NRA and it takes you back to 1968.


02/19/2018 12:39 pm

Several student-led demonstrations also erupted across Florida on Presidents Day.

WASHINGTON ― Dozens of students gathered in front of the White House on Monday to demand changes to gun laws, just days after a mass shooting at a Florida high school left 17 people dead.


The demonstration was organized by Teens For Gun Reform, an organization created by students in the Washington, D.C., area in the wake of Wednesday’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.


Protesters participated in what they said would be a three-minute lie-in, which began around 12:30 p.m. on Presidents Day. They lay down in front of the White House “in representation of the victims of school shootings,” according to a post on the group’s Facebook page.dogu

Demonstrators on the ground during a lie-in demonstration supporting gun control reform on Monday.

“By doing this, we will make a statement on the atrocities which have been committed due to the lack of gun control, and send a powerful message to our government that they must take action now,” the group wrote on Facebook.


Following the lie-in, protesters continued to hold signs in support of stricter guns laws and shouted phrases including “Shame on you” and “Disarm hate” toward the White House. The group also chanted “No more deaths,” “Am I next?” and “Hey, hey, NRA, how many kids have you killed today?”

Protesters hold signs during the demonstration against gun violence.

Last week’s massacre at the South Florida high school, in which a 19-year-old former student opened fire using an assault-style rifle, sparked protests and calls to action from students nationwide.


A group of students who survived the Parkland shooting have been outspoken in their criticism of Trump and lawmakers who receive financial contributions from gun lobbying groups such as the National Rifle Association.


On Sunday, the students announced plans for a march on Washington to demand congressional action on gun violence. The event, dubbed “March For Our Lives,” is scheduled for March 24.


Whitney Bowen and Eleanor Nuechterlein, both 16-year-old high school students from the D.C. area, started Teens For Gun Reform just two days after the Parkland shooting.

We might be 16 now and we might not be able to vote, but we can protest and we can use social media and we will make our voices heard.Whitney Bowen, co-founder of Teens For Gun Reform

“You never wake up thinking it’s going to be your school or it’s going to be your friends or family,” Bowen told HuffPost. “The Parkland kids didn’t either. … They woke up and went to school for the last time because there’s not enough gun control.”


Monday’s protest at the White House was planned on Presidents Day for symbolic reasons, Nuechterlein said. It’s not enough for President Donald Trump and other politicians to say “sorry” after school shootings, she said, they also need to start taking real legislative action to prevent them from happening.


Both Bowen and Nuechterlein said they plan to attend next month’s march on Washington.


“We might be 16 now and we might not be able to vote, but we can protest and we can use social media and we will make our voices heard,” Bowen said. “At the end of the day, it doesn’t come down to politics. It comes down to kids dying in classrooms.”

Elodie Camus, a 15-year-old student at the British International School of Washington, D.C., participated in the White House protest Monday with her mother


U.S. gun laws “have put so many people in danger over the years in this country and there needs to be reform,” Camus told HuffPost, adding that she no longer feels “safe at all” at school.


“Something needs to be changed so not as many people are harmed,” she said.

Elodie Camus, protesting with her friend, doesn’t feel as safe in school anymore

Felicia Garber, whose two daughters survived the Parkland shooting, was in D.C. with her family when she heard about Monday’s protest and decided to attend the demonstration.


“We felt it was important to be present and thank the people who felt it was worth coming out here on this cold, dreary, rainy holiday to help let whoever is in this beautiful White House know that we will not take this any longer,” Garber told HuffPost.


“These legislators need to step up for our children and not just for these lobbyists,” she continued. ”[Parkland] kids are smart, educated, savvy … and they are outraged. These are young adults who are ready and unforgiving, and I can only hope this is the beginning of the change they can create for our country.”


Several other student-led protests against gun violence erupted across Florida on Monday. Students staged a walk out at Olympic Heights Community High School in West Boca Raton, while parents joined their kids in front of American Heritage School in Plantation just 30 miles to the south.

Another student-led protest in response to the Stoneman Douglas High massacre. This one is happening now outside American Heritage School. The kids, joined by some parents, are demanding more gun control. @nbc6

Student protest in front of Hollywood, FL City Hall: “What Do We Want? Gun Control!”

See video and more photos of the D.C. protest below:

  • Zach Gibson/Getty Images
    Protesters lie on the ground during a demonstration supporting gun control.
  • Zach Gibson/Getty Images
    Demonstrators chant during Monday’s protest.
  • Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images
    Students and supporters hold signs as they protest outside the White House.
  • Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images
    Students protest against gun violence.
  • Zach Gibson/Getty Images
    Demonstrators chant outside the White House.
  • Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images
    Students and supporters gather on Pennsylvania Avenue.

No Rational Argument (NRA) June 19, 2016

Posted by rogerhollander in Arms, Uncategorized.
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Merry Christmas and Bang, You’re Dead December 12, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Gun Control/Violence, Humor.
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Oh, I Forgot, Guns Don’t Kill April 28, 2014

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Trayvon Martin Nativity Display At Claremont United Methodist Church Urges Us Not To Forget Gun Violence Victims December 28, 2013

Posted by rogerhollander in Gun Control/Violence, Racism, Religion.
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Roger’s note: I am not that big on organized Christianity or the nativity myth, but there are some few who call themselves Christian who actually do reflect the ethic of love and peace.  And I am big on remembering Trayvon Martin and the institutionalized racism and gun industry that were responsible for his murder as much as the fool Zimmerman.


Posted: 12/27/2013 1:41 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/27/2013 6:02 pm EST Huff Post

Trayvon Martin hasn’t been forgotten at Claremont United Methodist Church in Claremont, Cali.– in fact, he appears front and center in their Nativity display. He serves as a bloody and tragic reminder of the dangers of gun violence and racial privilege in today’s America, reports David Allen of the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.

Amongst the traditional holy family, Martin sits hunched over in his iconic black hoodie, blood pouring from his chest and pooling at his feet, reports Patch.com. The title of the scene, “A Child is Born, a Son is Given,” is outlined within the blood and evokes themes of both Christmas and Easter, according to artist John Zachary, who has been creating thought-provoking displays since 2007.


Zachary told Allen in an interview that the acquittal of George Zimmerman, who fatally shot the unarmed teenager in 2012, “struck him as a worthy subject for Christmas comment.”

“There is no better time to reflect on gun violence than advent, when we celebrate the birth of Jesus,” says a sign at the church.. “Jesus was born into a state of total vulnerability as an innocent, unarmed child during a time of great violence much like Trayvon Martin.”

As families gather together at Christmas to celebrate, Zachary hopes to get them to think long and hard about their own blessings and privileges. He told Allen that many Christmas traditions of gifts reflect “privilege, and there’s a lot of people who don’t have that privilege. Maybe I should do something that’s provocative, that’s more in keeping with the teachings of Jesus.”

Artist John Zachary

This isn’t the first time that the church has used the Nativity as an opportunity to remind people about issues of social justice and inequality, which probably would have been of great concern to Jesus himself. Past displays have included Jesus and Mary as a homeless couple struggling to feed their newborn child, as Iraqi refugees next to U.S. soldiers, as immigrants from Mexico stopped by the wall at the border, among others. In 2011, Zachary’s Nativity display was of the outlines of three couples, two of them same-sex, gathering under the banner “Christ Is Born.”

Sharon Rhodes-Wickett, lead pastor at the church, told Allen that she finds this year’s scene difficult to look at, due to its violence. “It’s hard to look at a young man who’s shot and bleeding to death,” she said. “But even though I’m uncomfortable, that’s the point. We have to take a look at the violence.”

Response to the display has been surprisingly muted. “I thought this would be more controversial, but I come to find out people don’t really like people getting shot,” Zachary told Allen. “They may not agree what to do about it, but they agree it’s a bad thing.”

Rhodes-Wickett said that her congregation is progressive, and that “Most people like something that makes us think and makes us search our hearts.”


Also on HuffPost:


How Much Did It Cost to Block a Gun Control Bill That 91% of Americans Support? This Much. May 14, 2013

Posted by rogerhollander in Democracy, Gun Control/Violence.
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A National Receipt from the 45 senators who blocked gun control, and who received $8,165,490 from the NRA and other gun-toting advocates. From Demand Action.


Adolphus Busch IV Resigns From NRA After Gun Control Defeat In Senate April 19, 2013

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Roger’s note: this article makes it crystal clear that it is the arms and munition manufacturers who are behind the sleazebag LaPierre and the blood-tainted US Senators who enable the massacres we now witness on a regular basis.

WASHINGTON — Adolphus Busch IV, heir to the Busch family brewing fortune, resigned his lifetime membership in the National Rifle Association on Thursday, writing in a letter to NRA President David Keene, “I fail to see how the NRA can disregard the overwhelming will of its members who see background checks as reasonable.”

The resignation, first reported by KSDK, came a day after the Senate rejected a series of amendments to a gun control bill, including a bipartisan deal to expand background checks for gun sales. The NRA had vigorously opposed all those measures.

“The NRA I see today has undermined the values upon which it was established,” wrote Busch. “Your current strategic focus clearly places priority on the needs of gun and ammunition manufacturers while disregarding the opinions of your 4 million individual members.”

Reached for comment on Busch’s resignation, NRA spokesman Andrew Arulanandam told The Huffington Post, “We disagree with his characterization, but we wish him all the best.”

Busch joined the pro-gun organization in 1975 and has spoken before of his love of hunting. But the NRA has moved in a direction that Busch would not follow. “One only has to look at the makeup of the 75-member board of directors, dominated by manufacturing interests, to confirm my point. The NRA appears to have evolved into the lobby for gun and ammunition manufacturers rather than gun owners,” he wrote.

Busch told Keene, “It disturbs me greatly to see this rigid new direction of the NRA.” He singled out the gun lobby’s reversal of its 1999 position in favor of universal background checks, as well as its opposition to an assault weapons ban and a ban on high-capacity magazines. “I am simply unable to comprehend how assault weapons and large capacity magazines have a role in your vision,” he wrote.

“Was it not the NRA position to support background checks when Mr. LaPierre himself stated in 1999 that NRA saw checks as ‘reasonable’?” Busch wrote, referring to NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre’s testimony at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in the wake of the 1999 Columbine High School shooting.

At that time, LaPierre said the NRA believed that universal background checks were a “reasonable” choice. The group even took out ads in major newspapers that read, “We believe it’s reasonable to provide for instant background checks at gun shows, just like gun stores and pawn shops.”

One week after that hearing, LaPierre rolled out the same argument that he would use 14 years later to attack President Barack Obama’s gun safety proposals — namely, that until the government prosecutes more background check violations, there is no point in expanding them.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story stated incorrectly that Adolphus Busch IV had resigned his membership on the NRA board. Busch was not a member of the board.


GABRIELLE GIFFORDS: A Senate in the Gun Lobby’s Grip April 18, 2013

Posted by rogerhollander in Democracy, Gun Control/Violence.
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April 17, 2013


SENATORS say they fear the N.R.A. and the gun lobby. But I think that fear must be nothing compared to the fear the first graders in Sandy Hook Elementary School felt as their lives ended in a hail of bullets. The fear that those children who survived the massacre must feel every time they remember their teachers stacking them into closets and bathrooms, whispering that they loved them, so that love would be the last thing the students heard if the gunman found them.

On Wednesday, a minority of senators gave into fear and blocked common-sense legislation that would have made it harder for criminals and people with dangerous mental illnesses to get hold of deadly firearms — a bill that could prevent future tragedies like those in Newtown, Conn., Aurora, Colo., Blacksburg, Va., and too many communities to count.

Some of the senators who voted against the background-check amendments have met with grieving parents whose children were murdered at Sandy Hook, in Newtown. Some of the senators who voted no have also looked into my eyes as I talked about my experience being shot in the head at point-blank range in suburban Tucson two years ago, and expressed sympathy for the 18 other people shot besides me, 6 of whom died. These senators have heard from their constituents — who polls show overwhelmingly favored expanding background checks. And still these senators decided to do nothing. Shame on them.

I watch TV and read the papers like everyone else. We know what we’re going to hear: vague platitudes like “tough vote” and “complicated issue.” I was elected six times to represent southern Arizona, in the State Legislature and then in Congress. I know what a complicated issue is; I know what it feels like to take a tough vote. This was neither. These senators made their decision based on political fear and on cold calculations about the money of special interests like the National Rifle Association, which in the last election cycle spent around $25 million on contributions, lobbying and outside spending.

Speaking is physically difficult for me. But my feelings are clear: I’m furious. I will not rest until we have righted the wrong these senators have done, and until we have changed our laws so we can look parents in the face and say: We are trying to keep your children safe. We cannot allow the status quo — desperately protected by the gun lobby so that they can make more money by spreading fear and misinformation — to go on.

I am asking every reasonable American to help me tell the truth about the cowardice these senators demonstrated. I am asking for mothers to stop these lawmakers at the grocery store and tell them: You’ve lost my vote. I am asking activists to unsubscribe from these senators’ e-mail lists and to stop giving them money. I’m asking citizens to go to their offices and say: You’ve disappointed me, and there will be consequences.

People have told me that I’m courageous, but I have seen greater courage. Gabe Zimmerman, my friend and staff member in whose honor we dedicated a room in the United States Capitol this week, saw me shot in the head and saw the shooter turn his gunfire on others. Gabe ran toward me as I lay bleeding. Toward gunfire. And then the gunman shot him, and then Gabe died. His body lay on the pavement in front of the Safeway for hours.

I have thought a lot about why Gabe ran toward me when he could have run away. Service was part of his life, but it was also his job. The senators who voted against background checks for online and gun-show sales, and those who voted against checks to screen out would-be gun buyers with mental illness, failed to do their job.

They looked at these most benign and practical of solutions, offered by moderates from each party, and then they looked over their shoulder at the powerful, shadowy gun lobby — and brought shame on themselves and our government itself by choosing to do nothing.

They will try to hide their decision behind grand talk, behind willfully false accounts of what the bill might have done — trust me, I know how politicians talk when they want to distract you — but their decision was based on a misplaced sense of self-interest. I say misplaced, because to preserve their dignity and their legacy, they should have heeded the voices of their constituents. They should have honored the legacy of the thousands of victims of gun violence and their families, who have begged for action, not because it would bring their loved ones back, but so that others might be spared their agony.

This defeat is only the latest chapter of what I’ve always known would be a long, hard haul. Our democracy’s history is littered with names we neither remember nor celebrate — people who stood in the way of progress while protecting the powerful. On Wednesday, a number of senators voted to join that list.

Mark my words: if we cannot make our communities safer with the Congress we have now, we will use every means available to make sure we have a different Congress, one that puts communities’ interests ahead of the gun lobby’s. To do nothing while others are in danger is not the American way.

Gabrielle Giffords, a Democratic representative from Arizona from 2007 to 2012, is a founder of Americans for Responsible Solutions, which focuses on gun violence.


The NRA Enemies List: AARP to YMCA to Britney Spears to Hallmark Cards February 4, 2013

Posted by rogerhollander in Gun Control/Violence, Humor.
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02.04.13 – 1:11 PM, http://www.commondreams.org

by Abby Zimet

Wow. Recently surfaced is a list published last year by the NRA of hundreds of allegedly “anti-gun” organizations, celebrities, journalists and corporations who have “lent monetary, grassroots or some other type of direct support” to the radical evil overlords who would rob us of our assault rifes and thus our liberty. A number of the celebrities are in fact dead or otherwise a decade or so removed from the limelight, but no matter: You never know when Jill Clayburgh will return from the next life to seize your semi-automatics. Among them: The American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Nurses Association, American Firearms Association (say what?), Consumer Federation of America, National Association of Chain Drug Stores, U.S. Catholic Conference, YMCA, Tony Bennett, N Sync, The Temptations, Geraldo, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Levi Strauss, Kansas City Chiefs, Time Warner, etc etc. Man, the NRA’s world must be getting some lonesome. Scary.

Here’s the entire list:

Ambulatory Pediatric Association
American Academy of Pediatrics
American Civil Liberties Union
American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing
American Medical Women`s Association
American Medical Student Association
American Medical Association
American Association for the Surgery of Trauma
American Trauma Society
American Federation of Teachers
American Association of School Administrators
American Alliance for Rights and Responsibilities
American Medical Association
American Bar Association
American Counseling Association
American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
American Academy of Pediatrics
American Association for World Health
American Ethical Union
American Nurses Association
American Association of Neurological Surgeons
American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences
American Firearms Association
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
American Jewish Committee
American Trauma Society
American Psychological Association
American Jewish Congress
American Public Health Association
Americans for Democratic Action
Anti-Defamation League
Black Mental Health Alliance
B`nai B`rith
Central Conference of American Rabbis
Children`s Defense Fund
Church of the Brethren
Coalition for Peace Action
Coalition to Stop Gun Violence
College Democrats of America
Committee for the Study of Handgun Misuse & World Peace
Common Cause
Congress of National Black Churches, Inc.
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Consumer Federation of America
Council of the Great City Schools
Council of Chief State School Officers
Dehere Foundation
Disarm Educational Fund
Environmental Action Foundation
Episcopal Church-Washington Office
Florence and John Shumann Foundation
Friends Committee on National Legislation
General Federation of Women`s Clubs
George Gund Fun
Gray Panthers
H.M. Strong Foundation
Harris Foundation
Hechinger Foundation
Interfaith Neighbors
Int`l Ladies` Garment Workers` Union
Int`l Association of Educators for World Peace
Jewish Labor Committee
Joyce Foundation
Lauder Foundation
Lawrence Foundation
League of Women Voters of the United States*
Lutheran Office for Governmental Affairs, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Manhattan Project II
Mennonite Central Committee-Washington Office
National Safe Kids Campaign
National Association of Police Organizations
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
National Black Nurses` Association
National Association of Chain Drug Stores
National Network for Youth
National Assembly of National Voluntary Health & Social Welfare Organizations
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
National Association of School Psychologists
National Association of Counties*
National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners
National Association of School Safety and Law Enforcement Officers
National Education Association
National Association of Elementary School Principals*
National Association of Public Hospitals
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
National Association of Secondary School Principals
National Association of Social Workers
National Association of Children`s Hospitals and Related Institutions
National Association of School Psychologists
National Council of La Raza
National Center to Rehabilitate Violent Youth
National Commission for Economic Conversion & Disarmament
National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA
National Council of Negro Women
National Association of Community Health Centers
National People`s Action
National Education Association*
National League of Cities
National Council on Family Relations
National Council of Jewish Women
National Organization for Women
National Political Congress of Black Women
National Parks and Conservation Association
National Peace Foundation
National Urban League, Inc.
National Parent, Teachers Association*
National Urban Coalition
National SAFE KIDS Campaign
National Organization on Disability
National Spinal Cord Injury Association
NETWORK: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby
Ortenberg Foundation
Peace Action
People for the American Way
Physicians for Social Responsibility
Police Foundation
Project on Demilitarization and Democracy
Public Citizen
Society of Critical Care Medicine
Southern Christian Leadership Conference
The Council of the Great City Schools
The Synergetic Society
20/20 Vision
U.S. Catholic Conference, Dept. of Social Development
Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Unitarian Universalist Association
United States Catholic Conference
United Methodist Church, General Board & Church Society
United Church of Christ, Office for Church in Society*
United States Conference of Mayors
War and Peace Foundation
Women Strike for Peace
Women`s National Democratic Club
Women`s Action for New Directions (WAND)
Women`s Int`l League for Peace and Freedom
World Spiritual Assembly, Inc.
YWCA of the U.S.A.

*The national organization only endorses federal legislation.

Anti-Gun Individuals & Celebrities

The following celebrities and national figures have lent their name and notoriety to anti-gun causes, speaking out for anti-gun legislation and providing a voice for anti-gun organizations.

Krista Allen – Actress

Suzy Amis – Actress

Louis Anderson – Comedian

Richard Dean Anderson – Actor

Maya Angelou – Poet

David Arquette – Actor

Ed Asner – Actor

Alec Baldwin – Actor

Bob Barker – TV Personality

Carol Bayer Sager – Composer

Drew Barrymore – Actress

Kevin Bacon – Actor

Lauren Bacall – Actress*

Sarah Ban Breathnach – Writer

William Baldwin – Actor

Candice Bergen – Actress

Richard Belzer – Actor

Tony Bennett – Singer

Boys II Men – Pop Group

Jon Bon Jovi – Singer

Peter Bogdonovich – Director

Peter Bonerz – Actor

Albert Brooks – Actor

Beau Bridges – Actor

Benjamin Bratt – Actor

Bonnie Bruckheimer – Movie Producer

Christie Brinkley – Model

Dr. Joyce Brothers – Psychologist/Author

James Brolin – Actor

James Brooks – TV Producer

Mel Brooks – Actor/Director

Betty Buckley – Actress

Ellen Burstyn – Actress

Steve Buscemi – Actor

David Canary – Actor

Kate Capshaw – Actress

Kim Cattrall- Actress

Josh Charles – Actor

Robert Chartloff – Producer

Stockard Channing – Actress

Jill Clayburgh – Actress

Terri Clark – Singer

George Clooney – Actor

Jennifer Connelly – Actress

Judy Collins – Singer

Kevin Costner – Actor

Sean Connery – Actor

Sheryl Crow – Singer

Billy Crystal- Actor

Julie Cypher – Director

Arlene Dahl – Actress

Clive Davis – Writer

Linda Dano – Actress

Matt Damon – Actor

Pam Dawber – Actress

Patrika Darbo – Actress

Stuart Damon – Actor

Ellen Degeneres – Actress

Gavin de Becker – Writer

Rebecca DeMornay – Actress

Danny DeVito – Actor

Michael Douglas – Actor

Phil Donahue – Talk Show Host

Richard Donner – Director

Fran Drescher – Actress

Richard Dreyfus – Actor

David Duchovny – Actor

Sandy Duncan – Actress

Christine Ebersole – Actress

Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds – Singer

Missy Elliott – Singer

Nora Ephron – Director

Gloria Estefan – Singer

Melissa Etheridge – Singer

Mia Farrow – Actress

Mike Farrell – Actor

Carrie Fisher – Actress

Sally Field – Actress

Doug Flutie – NFL player

Fannie Flagg – Actress

Jane Fonda – Actress

Jodie Foster – Actress

Rick Fox – NBA Player

Andy Garcia – Actor

Art Garfunkel – Singer

Geraldo – TV personality

Richard Gere – Actor

Kathie Lee Gifford – TV personality

Paul Glaser – TV director

Brad Gooch – Writer

Elliott Gould – Actor

Louis Gossett, Jr. – Actor

Michael Gross – Actor

Nancy Lee Grahn – Actress

Bryant Gumbel – TV Personality

Deidra Hall – Actress

Ethan Hawke – Actor

Mariette Hartley – Actress

Mark Harmon – Actor

Anne Heche – Actress

Howard Hesseman – Actor

Marilu Henner – Actress

Dustin Hoffman – Actor

Hal Holbrook – Actor*

Helen Hunt – Actress

John Ingle – Actor

Francesca James – TV Producer

Norman Jewison – Director

Lainie Kazan – Actress

Richard Karn – Actor

Jeffrey Katzenberg – Producer

Barry Kemp – TV Producer

David E. Kelley – TV Producer

Diane Keaton – Actress

Margaret Kemp – Interior Designer

Chaka Khan – Singer

Kevin Kline – Actor

Michael E. Knight – Actor

Jonathan Kozol – Writer

Lenny Kravits – Singer

Lisa Kudrow – Actress

Wally Kurth – Actor

Christine Lahti – Actress

k.d. lang – Singer

Ricki Lake – TV personality

Denis Leary – Actor

John Leguizamo – Actor

Norman Lear – TV Producer

Spike Lee – Director

Hal Linden – Actor

Tara Lipinski – Former Olympian

Keyshawn Johnson – NFL player

Rob Lowe – Actor

Amanda Marshall – Singer

Barry Manilow – Singer

Camryn Manheim – Actress

Howie Mandel – Actor

Kyle MacLachlan – Actor

Madonna – Singer

Marla Maples – Actress

Marsha Mason – Actress*

Mase – Singer

Penny Marshall – Director

Prema Mathai-Davis – YWCA Official

John McDaniel – Musician

John McEnroe – Athlete

Brian McKnight – Musician

Natalie Merchant – Singer

Bette Midler – Singer

Mary Tyler Moore – Actress

Michael Moore – Film Maker

Mike Myers – Actor

N Sync – Music group

Kathy Najimy – Actress

Jack Nicholson – Actor

Leonard Nimoy – Actor

Mike Nichols – Director

Stephen Nichols – Actor

Rosie O`Donnel l- Actress/Talk Show Host

Jennifer O Neill – Actress

Julia Ormond – Actress

Jane Pauley – TV Personality

Sarah Jessica Parker – Actress

Mandy Patinkin – Actor

Richard North Patterson – Writer

Rhea Perlman- Actress

Michelle Pfieffer – Actress

Aidan Quinn – Actor

Colin Quinn – Actor

Dennis Quaid – Actor

Elizabeth Bracco Quinn – Actress

Bonnie Raitt – Singer

Debbie Reynolds – Actress

Mary Lou Retton – Former Olympian

Paul Reiser – Actor

Peter Reckell – Actor

Rob Reiner – Actor/Director

Robert Redford – Actor/Director

Anne Rice – Writer

Cathy Rigby – Actress

Julia Roberts – Actress

Marc Rosen – TV Producer

Tim Robbins – Actor

Tim Roth – Actor

Renee Russo – Actress

Robin Ruzan – Wife of Mike Myers

Meg Ryan – Actress

Susan Sarandon – Actress

Jerry Seinfeld – Actor

Kyra Sedgwick – Actress

Martin Sheen – Actor

Russell Simmons – Record Producer

Neil Simon – Playwright*

Louise Sorel – Actress

Mira Sorvino – Actress

Rena Sofer – Actress

Britney Spears – Singer

Bruce Springsteen – Singer

Kevin Spirtas – Actor

Barbra Streisand – Singer

David Steinberg – Director

Sylvester Stallone – Actor

Harry Dean Stanton – Actor

Meryl Streep – Actress

Patrick Stewart – Actor

Sharon Stone – Actress

Sting – Singer

Trudie Styler – Actress

Jonathan Taylor Thomas – Actor

The Temptations – Pop Group

Vinny Testaverde – NFL player

Marlo Thomas – Actress*

Uma Thurman – Actress

Steve Tisch – Producer

Mike Torrez – Former Baseball player

Shania Twain – Singer

Dick Van Dyke – Actor

Eli Wallach – Actor*

Harvey Weinstein – Producer

Jann Wenner – Publisher

Sigourney Weaver – Actress

Victor Webster – Actor

Andy Williams – Singer*

Kelli Williams – Actress

Henry Winkler – Actor

Oprah Winfrey – Entertainer

Rita Wilson – Actress

Vanessa Williams – Singer

Herman Wouk – Author

Joanne Woodward – Actress*

Peter Yarrow – Singer

Catherine Zeta-Jones – Actress

Ahmet Zappa -Actor

Diva Zappa -Actress

Dweezil Zappa – Musician

Gail Zappa –

Moon Zappa -Actress

* Denotes membership on

Brady Campaign`s National Committee

National Figures:

Joel J. Alpert M.D. – Pediatrician

Robert Bernstein Ph.D – Pediatrician

Robert E. Brennan – Financier

Bishop Edmond Browning – Espiscopal Leader

James E. Carter – Former President

Marion Wright Edelman – Director, Childrens Defense Fund

Michael Eisner, Former Chairman and CEO The Walt Disney Company

Amitai Etzioni – Teacher

Tom Freston – MTV President

Dr. Lorraine E. Hale – Social Worker

Della M. Hughes – Activist

Ed Koch – Former Politician

C. Everett Koop – Former Surgeon General

Rev. Wallace Ryan Kuroiwa – Clergyman

Gerald M. Levin – Chairman, Time Warner

Davis S. Liederman – Ex. Dir. Child Welfare League

Paul Rabbi Menitaff – Clergyman

Abner Mikva – Former Judge

Richard Parsons – Pres. Time Warner

Steven Rockefeller – Financier

Ellen Y. Rosenberg – Activist

Rabbi David Saperstein – Clergyman

Herb Scannell – Pres. Nickelodeon

Vincent Schiraldi – Dir. Justice Policy Institute

Lyle Elmer Strom – Federal Judge

Joe Volk – Clergyman

Rabbi Eric H. Yoffie – Clergyman

The following journalists actively

editorialize in favor of gun control laws:

Steve Benson – Cartoonist

Tony Auth – Cartoonist

Jim Borgman – Cartoonist

Jimmy Breslin – Columnist

Stuart Carlson – Cartoonist

Marie Cocco – Columnist

E.J. Dionne Jr. – Columnist

Bonnie Erbe – Columnist

Tom Fiedler – Columnist

Michael Gartner – Columnist

Mark Genrich – Columnist

James Glassman – Editor

Bob Herbert – Columnist

Bill Johnson – Columnist

Donald Kaul – Columnist

Mike Lane – Cartoonist

Leonard Larson – Columnist

Mike Luckovich – Cartoonist

Jimmy Margulies – Cartoonist

Deborah Mathis – Columnist

Colman McCarthy – Columnist

Jim Morin – Cartoonist

Tom Oliphant- Columnist

Mike Peters – Cartoonist

Robert Reno – Columnist

Frank Rich – Columnist

Cindy Richards – Columnist

Kevin Siers- Cartoonist

Ed Stein – Cartoonist

Tom Teepen – Editor

Tim Toles – Cartoonist

Garry Trudeau – Cartoonist

Cynthia Tucker – Columnist

Steve Twomey – Columnist

Steve Villano – Columnist

Adrienne Washington – Columnist

Don Wright – Cartoonist

Anti-Gun Corporations/Corporate HeadsThe following listing includes the most prominent national corporations that have lent their corporate support to gun control initiatives or taken position supporting gun control.

A & M Records
Al Cafaro, Chrm. & CEO
595 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022
(212) 826-0477
Record Production, Entertainment

American Century Companies
James E. Stowers, CEO
4500 Main St., 4th Floor
Kansas City, MO 64111
(816) 531-5575
Mutual Fund & Stock Investment Company on NYSE

American Multi Cinemas Entertainment, Inc.
Stanley H. Durwood, Co-Chairman, CEO Peter C. Brown, President, CFO
106 West 14th Street, #1700
Kansas City, MO 64141
(816) 221-4000
Movie Theater Company

Argosy Casino
H. Steven Norton, President, CEO
777 N.W. Argosy Parkway
Riverside, MO 64150
(816) 746-7711
Gambling Casino Company

Ben & Jerry`s Homemade, Inc.
Bennett R. Cohen Chrm. & CEO
Rte. 100, Box 240
Waterbury, VT 05676
(802) 244-5641
Ice cream and frozen yogurt

BJC Health Systems
Fred L. Brown, President & CEO
4444 Forest Park Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63108
(314) 747-9322
Healthcare Company

Blue Cross Blue Shield – Kansas City
John P. Mascotte, President
P.O. Box 419169
Kansas City, MO 64141
(816) 395-2222
Healthcare Company

Brooks Investments-Robert Brooks
Robert Brooks
45 Chesterfield Lakes Road
Chesterfield, MO 63005
Investment Company

Carter Hawley Hale Stores, Inc.
Philip M. Hawley, Chrm. & CEO
444 South Flower Street
Los Angeles, CA 90071
(213) 620-0150
Retail clothing and accessories stores

Crown Central Petroleum Corp.
Henry A. Rosenberg, Jr.
One North Central Street Box 1168
Baltimore, MD 21203
(301) 539-7400
Refiners and marketers of petroleum products, convenience stores

Development Specialists – Chicago
70 W. Madison Street, #2300
Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 263-4141

Earthgrains – St. Louis
8400 Maryland Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 259-7000
National Bread Company

General American – St. Louis
Richard A. Liddy, CEO
P.O. Box 396
St. Louis, MO 63166
(314) 843-8700
Life Insurance

Hallmark Cards
Irvine O. Hockaday, President & CEO
P.O. Box 418307
Kansas City, MO 64141
(816) 274-5111
Greeting Card Company

Health Midwest
2316 East Meyer Boulevard
Kansas City, MO 64132
(816) 751-3000
National Healthcare Company

ICN Biomedicals
Adam Jerney, Chrm. & CEO
3300 Hyland Avenue
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
(714) 545-0113
Pharmaceutical products

James B. Nutter Co. – Kansas City
James B. Nutter
4153 Broadway
Kansas City, MO 64111
(816) 531-2345
Investment Banker

Kansas City Chiefs
One Arrowhead Drive
Kansas City, MO 64129
(816) 924-9300
Pro Football Team

Kansas City Royals
David Glass, CEO
P.O. Box 419969
Kansas City, MO 64141
(816) 921-8000
Pro Baseball Team

Kenneth Cole
152 W. 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
(800) 536-2653
Clothing retailer

Lamar Advertising Company
Lamar Outdoor Advertising
5551 Corporate Boulevard, Suite 2-A
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
P. O. Box 66338
Baton Rouge, LA 70896
(225) 926-1000
Fax (225) 926-1005

Levi Strauss & Co.
Robert D. Haas, Chairman
Philip Marineau, CEO
Peter A. Jacobi, President and COO
1155 Battery St.
San Francisco, CA 94111
(415) 501-6000
FAX (415) 501-3939

Mallinckrodt, Inc. – St. Louis
C. Ray Holman, President & CEO
675 McDonnell Blvd, Box 5840
St. Louis, MO 63134
(314) 654-2000
Clothing Starch Company

Michael Douglas Foundation
3550 Wilshire
Los Angele, CA 90010

MNC Financial, Inc.
Ten Light Street Box 987
Baltimore, MD 21203
(301) 244-5000
Banking, financial services

Sara Lee Corporation
Sara Lee Foundation
Three First National Plaza
Chicago, IL 60602-4260
Phone: 312-726-2600
Fax: 312-726-3712

Silver Dollar City
Peter Herschend
One Corporate Drive
Branson, MO 65616
800 475-9370
Amusement Parks

Site Oil Company – St. Louis
Alvin J. Siteman, President
50 S. Bemiston
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 725-4321
Oil Company

Southland Corporation
Masatoshi Ito, Chrm.
2711 North Haskell Avenue
Dallas, TX 75221
Convenience stores

Southwestern Bell Telephone- St. Louis
One Bell Center
St. Louis, MO 63101
(314) 235-9800
Telecommunications Firm

Sport & Health, Inc.
Don Konz, CEO
1800 Old Meadow Rd.
McLean, Virginia 22102
(703) 556-6556
Health clubs and fitness centers

Sprint Corp PAC
William T. Esrey, Chrm., Pres. & CEO 2330 Shawnee Mission Parkway
Westwood, KS 66205
913 624-3000
Telecommunicaitons Firm

SSM Health System – St. Louis
477 N. Lindbergh
St. Louis, MO 63141
(314) 994-7800
Healthcare Company

St. Louis Rams
One Rams Way
Earth City, MO 63045
(314) 982-7267
Pro Football Team

St. Louis University
Rev. Lawrence Biondi, President
221 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63103
(314) 977-2222
Private Catholic University

Stoneyfield Farms Yogurt
Mr. Gary Hirshberg, CEO
10 Burton Drive
Londonderry, NH 03053
(603) 437-7594

Sverdrup Corp.
Richard E. Beumer,
Chairman & CEO
13723 Riverport Drive
Maryland Heights, MO 63043
(314) 436-7600
Engineering Firm

Time Warner Inc.
Gerald M. Levin, Chrm. & CEO
75 Rockefeller Plaza
New York, NY 10019
(212) 364-8300
Publishing, film and music recordings

TMP Worldwide/Monster.Com
Andrew McKelvey, CEO
1633 Broadway, 33rd Fl.
New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-977-4200
Fax: 212-956-2142
online employment service

Unity Health – St. Louis
1650 Des Peres Road #301
St. Louis, MO 63131
(314) 909-3300
Healthcare Company

Working Assets
Peter Barnes, Founder
701 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, California 94111
(415) 788-0777

Publication and Media OutletsThe following publications and media outlets have assisted in the attack on Second Amendment rights. The editorial policies of some of the media sources listed portray firearms in a negative manner in an attempt to generate public support for restrictions on firearms ownership. Others have refused some or all of NRA`s advertisements.
Capital Cities/ABC
Television Network
77 W. 66th Street
New York, NY 10023-6298
(212) 456-7777

Bell Atlantic-D.C.
2055 L Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 392-9900

Blue Chip Stamps
15801 S. Eastern Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90040
(213) 720-4600

The Christian Publishing Society
The Christian Science Monitor
One Norway Street
Boston, MA 02115
(508) 586-6200

Columbia Broadcasting Service
CBS Television Network
51 W. 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 975-4321

Corporation For Public Broadcasting/ PBS Television
1320 Braddock Place
Alexandria, VA 22314-1698
(703) 739-5000
(703) 739-0775 – Fax

Cox Newspapers
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Credibank Towers, Suite 400
2800 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33137
(305) 576-7678

Gannett News Service
USA Today
1000 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, VA 22229
(703) 276-5806

Johnson Publishing Company, Inc.
Ebony Magazine
820 S. Michigan avenue
Chicago, IL 60605-2190
(312) 322-9250

Knight-Ridder Newspapers
Detroit Free-Press
321 W. LaFayette Blvd.
Detroit, MI 48231
(313) 222-6400

Miami Herald
One Herald Plaza
Miami, FL 33132-1683
(305) 350-2111

Los Angeles Times
Times Mirror Square
Los Angeles, California 90053
(213) 237-4511
(213) 237-7679 – Fax

McCall`s Magazine
110 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10017-5603
(212) 463-1000

Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine
Emap PLC
6420 Wilshire Blvd., Floor 17
Los Angeles, California 90048
(323) 782-2000

National Broadcasting Company
NBC Television Network
30 Rockefeller Plaza
New York, NY 10112
(212) 664-4444

Newsweek, Inc.
Newsweek Magazine
444 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022-6999
(212) 350-4000

Rolling Stone Magazine
Jann Wenner, Chrm. & CEO
745 5th, Avenue
New York, NY 10151
(212) 758-3800

The New York Times Corporation
The New York Times
229 W. 43rd Street
New York, NY 10036
(212) 556-1234

Time Magazine
Time & Life Building
Rockefeller Center
New York, NY 10020
(212) 522-1212

Times-Mirror Corporation
The Los Angeles Times
Times Mirror Square
Los Angeles, CA 90053
(213) 237-3000

The Baltimore Sun
501 N. Calvert Street
Baltimore, MD 21278
(301) 332-6300

The Tribune Company
Chicago Tribune
435 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 227-3000

Washington Post
1150 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20071
(202) 334-6000

Compiled by:
NRA Institute for Legislative Action
11250 Waples Mill Road
Fairfax, Virginia 22030