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The Way of the Warrior: How To Stop A Pipeline November 11, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Energy, Environment, First Nations.
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Roger’s note: This is direct action.  These are people taking their destiny into their own hands, perhaps the government and oil monopolies have left them no alternative.  I can foresee a violent and tragic confrontation.  I am sure they are expecting in and are ready for it, perhaps ready to die protecting their land and people.  A lesson to all of us.

With a newly elected Congress gearing up to pass Keystone, the inspiring story of the Unist’ot’en Camp, an indigenous resistance community established in northwest Canada to protect sovereign Wet’suwet’en territory and blockade up to 10 additional proposed pipelines aimed at expanding Alberta Tar Sands operations. The Uni’stot’en Clan, which has families living in cabins and traditional structures in the direct pathway of the Northern Gateway and Pacific Trails fracking lines, argues that “since time immemorial” they have governed Wet’suwet’en lands, which thus remain unceded and not subject to Canadian law “or other impositions of colonial occupation” – an argument that has been sustained in court cases, and bolstered by the camp’s recent peaceable ejection of a drilling crew..

Camp leaders note that delays caused by their and other grassroots blockades are said to be costing Kinder Morgan and other companies up to $88 million a month, one reason the companies have filed multi-million suits against camp leaders that are still pending. But with Wet’suwet’en law requiring consent from the traditional indigenous governments in territories  where indigenous people probably outnumber “settler people,” opponents appear to have the law on their side. “Our Chiefs have said no to these projects, and no means no,” says Freda Huson, Unist’ot’en Clan member and camp spokesperson. “You can’t continue to bulldoze over our people. Our lands. Our final say.”

 

 

My Lai Was Not An ‘Incident': Seeking Full Disclosure on Vietnam October 20, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Asia, History, Vietnam, War.
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Roger’s note: Nearly sixty thousand American soldiers died, god knows how many wounded physically, mentally and spiritually.  Over a million Vietnamese killed, many more wounded, the countryside scorched with Agent Orange.  For what?  So that Lyndon Johnson would not go down as the president who “lost” Vietnam?  the way Truman “lost” China?  Was LBJ a misguided politician or a war criminal?  Is Obama a beleaguered president or a war criminal?  Don’t ask me.  Ask the families of the slaughtered.  Where have all the flowers gone ?

 

Language is telling; so are facts. With the approach of the “full panoply of Orwellian forgetfulness” that is a 13-year, $65 million commemoration of the Vietnam War by the same people who started it, it’s nigh on impossible to reconcile Obama’s “valor of a generation that served with honor fighting heroically to protect the ideals we hold dear as Americans” with the savage years many “remember, with painful acuity, as other than glorious” – years of lies, loss, rage, trauma, protests and the deaths of millions of innocents. Seeking to “speak truth to power,” Veterans For Peace are rejecting an official narrative they say sanitizes and mythologizes an unconscionable war – and likely helps legitimize further such wars – by organizing their own Peace and Justice Commemoration as part of a larger Full Disclosure Campaign. Its goal is to “truly examine what happened during those tragic and tumultuous years,” and use those lessons to prevent them from happening again.

From the start, many have questioned what longtime activist Tom Hayden calls the “staggering” idea of a commemoration orchestrated by the Department of Defense. Citing the Pentagon’s questionable “version of the truth” that for so long sustained an immoral war, he convincingly argues that, “If you conduct a war, you shouldn’t be in charge of narrating it.” Almost everything about the project, from its website full of glossy pictures of smiling veterans to its very language – its mission to “assist a grateful nation” in thanking veterans, Obama’s thinking “with solemn reverence upon the valor of a generation,” its initial labelling of the massacre of 500 women, children and older men at My Lai an “incident” – bears out the notion that the project’s goal is largely “an ex post factojustification of the war,” or to rewrite history in order to repeat it with as little opposition as possible.

In a petition for revisions that sparked their decision to hold their own commemoration, over 500 veterans and activists argued for “an honest remembrance of what actually went on in Viet Nam.” They seek recognition for the “many thousands of veterans” who opposed or came to oppose the war, who refused the draft, went to jail, left the country, marched in protests; for the millions who marched, prayed, organized; for the military establishment that for years lied, propagandized, made deadly mistakes, and lied again; for the thousands of hapless soldiers thrown into a war of choice who suffered, died, anguished and then came home broken, traumatized and often abandoned – startlingly, more Vietnam veterans subsequently died by suicide than in battle; for the millions of Vietnamese civilians killed, maimed, poisoned, traumatized, driven from their homes, crippled by land mines, their children later disfigured by Agent Orange; for the rage and regret felt by so many Americans towards the war’s lies and losses that a new term was created to express their weariness – the Vietnam Syndrome.

To right those wrongs and expose those truths, Veterans For Peace are now looking for stories, ideas, articles and photos for their own commemoration. “It is incumbent on us not to cede the war’s memory to those who have little interest in an honest accounting, and who want to justify further acts of military adventurism,” they argue. The war, they insist, is a cautionary tale: “What are the consequences of trying to control the fate of a people from afar with little understanding or interest in their history and culture…or their human desires?  What are the consequences of dehumanized ideologies used to justify wars of aggression?  To honor the Viet Nam generation and to inform current and future generations, we should make every effort to pass on a critical and honest history of the war.”

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Victor Jara’s Long Arc September 12, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Art, Literature and Culture, Chile, Foreign Policy, Latin America.
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Roger’s note: The other 9/11.  Another case of U.S. imperial, militaristic, CIA lead murderous intervention in Latin America, a tradition that goes back to the Monroe Doctrine and continues today most blatantly in Venezuela, Colombia and Honduras (with the wilful support of Obama and the enthusiastic support of Hillary Clinton).

 

Today is the 41st anniversary of Chile’s 9/11, when Pinochet and his CIA-backed military junta overthrew Salvador Allende, Latin America’s first democratically elected Socialist leader, and began a 17-year reign of terror. Marking “a milestone” in the tragic story of their most famous and beloved victim, Chilean officials last week announced the arrest of three more former army officers in the murder of poet and songwriter Victor Jara, who was arrested soon after the coup with over 5,000 others and held, beaten and tortured for days; had his hands broken; and valiantly tried to sing the iconic Allende hymn “Venceremos” before being cut down by 44 Fascist bullets on September 16. Thanks in part to his indefatigable widow Joan’s decades-long fight for justice for Jara, the three officers join eight others charged in 2012. Another 700 military officials still await trial; the Jara family have also filed a civil lawsuit against another former officer now living in the U.S. Unsurprisingly, given newly revealed documents showing that President Reagan considered making Pinochet “a guest of our government” with an offer of political asylum, there’s been no move toward extradiction. In Chile, meanwhile, Jara remains a much-mourned hero and powerful symbol of freedom. Thousands attended a moving 2009 funeral for him when he was publicly re-buried, and the stadium where he died, now a sports venue and Chile’s largest homeless shelter, bears his name. A plaque there marks his death and that of so many others with a few wrenching, hopeful lines from the last thing he wrote. More in tribute here and here.

How hard it is to sing
when I must sing of horror.
Horror which I am living,
horror which I am dying.
To see myself among so much
and so many moments of infinity
in which silence and screams
are the end of my song.
What I see, I have never seen
What I have felt and what I feel
Will give birth to the moment…

 

Holocaust Survivors On Gaza: Genocide Begins With the Silence of the World August 29, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Israel, Gaza & Middle East, War.
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 www.common dreams.org

History turns: Even as Israel’s onslaught in Gaza continues – in the latest insanity,obliterating an apartment building housing 44 families to punish one alleged combatant – over 300 Holocaust survivors and descendants have written a stunning condemnation of Jewish attempts to “justify the unjustifiable” and blasted “the massacre of Palestinians in Gaza.” Outraged by Elie Wiesel’s recent “abuse of our history” in an ad wherein he supported the assault on Gaza and compared Hamas to the Nazis, the survivors insist “nothing can justify” the murder of over 2,000 Palestinians, many of them children. Like a growing number of other Jews turning against Israel, they condemn both U.S. funding of Israel and Western silence, and call for an end to the siege and blockade of Gaza as well as a total economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel. And they use the word from their own singular experience: “Genocide begins with the silence of the world.” Extraordinary.

“We must raise our collective voices and use our collective power to bring about an end to all forms of racism, including the ongoing genocide of Palestinian people…’Never again’ must mean NEVER AGAIN FOR ANYONE!”

We Need to Recognize What Barbaric Is August 13, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Israel, Gaza & Middle East, War.
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Roger’s note:

Violent husband to wife; “Don’t make me hit you.”

Five year old to mother: “Johnny made me hit him.”

Netanyahu: “Hamas made me kill 400 children.”

 

 

As Gazans begin to return to their shattered lives and neighborhoods, the U.N. has announced a panel to investigate war crimes there, at least those beyond the obvious: 1,814 Palestinians killed, 86% of them civilians including over 400 children, and 485,000 displaced. Still, more stories emerge. Amnesty International has released testimony from health workers showing the Israeli army repeatedly attacked ambulances, hospitals, medics, doctors and others seeking to help the wounded and collect the dead. In light of that and so much else, in a searing speech at an Austin protest, Dr. Rania Masri cites President Obama calling the capture of an invading Israeli soldier by the Palestinian Resistance a “barbaric action” and schools him in what is and is not “barbaric.”

“Barbaric is to deny our identity and to deny our existence…In the name of the Palestinians, who are the most resilient people I have ever known…we pledge to them, that when the bombs stop – and they will stop — we will remember our anger today, we will remember our tears today, and we will not be broken.”

 

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Sderot Cinema: Israelis Watch Gaza Bombing For Just Good Fun July 15, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Human Rights, Israel, Gaza & Middle East, War.
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Roger’s note: “War is Peace,” George Orwell

Murder as public spectacle

 

tease_sderot_orig_bsicixqcqaat17z

 

by Abby Zimet

Three Palestinian brothers mourn their parents

Ever-enterprising Israelis dragged plastic chairs and sofas up to a Sderot hill to eat popcorn, smoke hookahs and cheer when explosions lit up the night sky over Gaza in a photo posted by Danish reporter Allan Sørensen with the caption, “Clapping when blasts are heard.” Afollow-up story in Kristeligt Dagblad said over 50 Israelis had transformed the hill, dubbed the Hill of Shame in an earlier war, into “something that most closely resembles the front row of a reality war theater.” The photo has caused outrage online, where commenters have blasted “the morality of a people so skewed that murder is a public spectacle.” Spectatorssay they were there to “look at Israel creating peace” and “see Israel destroy Hamas.” They inexplicably fail to mention the part about burning children. Oh Israel, what have youwrought?

Burial of a four-year-old

 

 

The Undisputed Truth About Israeli Occupation July 7, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Israel, Gaza & Middle East.
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Roger’s note: perhaps the painting says it all.  

All too often the ‘honest brokers’ mediating negotiations agree with our occupiers that the destructive spread of settlements is not on occupied land.

(Image: Banksy)

Imagine for a moment a man who picks someone’s safe and loots a hoard of money. The victim, tracking the man down, demands the money back. But the fellow refuses to recognize the cash as someone else’s property; it is “disputed.” The wronged party finally brings in a mediator, but, adopting the man’s logic about the money being “disputed” and not stolen, the mediator tells the victim to work out his disagreement directly with the man. And so the lucky man continues spending, the mediator continues mediating, and the victim remains a victim, poorer by the day.

I often think of this analogy when, sitting in my home up on Mount Gerizim above Nablus, I stare out a window at the rapidly expanding colony of Har Bracha.

Since 1967, the Palestinians have lost control of their land, hilltop by hilltop, field by field, and none of the mediators sent our way has managed to stop or even to slow the ever-quickening pace of dispossession. Often the mediator has provided diplomatic cover for this.

This is all the more disturbing because the basic contours of a two-state solution have been well known and accepted by the Palestinian leadership for over 30 years. In 1981, the Palestine Liberation Organization was, like most other national liberation movements, seeking the total defeat of the enemy. Article 1 of the PLO Charter, drafted in 1964 by nationalist delegates at the Intercontinental Hotel on Jerusalem’s Mount of Olives, spelled it out: “Palestine is an Arab homeland bound by strong Arab national ties to the rest of the Arab countries and which together form the great Arab homeland.” By “Palestine,” of course, the delegates meant the entire territory between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean.

I was one of the delegates that day. Because I assumed that was the way the conflict should end, I was surprised when I got a phone call in my London office in 1981. Saudi Crown Prince Fahd was on the line. “Yes, your Royal Highness.” The prince sounded like he was on a treadmill, he was so out of breath. Once he calmed down he told me he had a “plan” to bring peace to the Holy Land. He had already discussed the plan with Yasser Arafat.

What I heard that afternoon was unfathomable: The Saudis were willing to offer the Israelis peace with the Arabs once they cleared out of the occupied territories, dismantled the settlements, solved the refugee issue, and agreed to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state. And then “all states in the region should be able to live in peace.”

Even more surprising to me was Arafat’s reaction: He accepted what came to be known as the Fez Initiative. Arafat made it even clearer in 1988 that he was willing to accept the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, 22 percent of historic Palestine, as our future Palestinian state. Needless to say, this was a painful decision for him to take.

This was the logic behind his embrace of the Oslo Accords in 1993, and the reason he signed off on the Arab Peace Initiative in 2002, which, like the Fez Initiative, offers Israel full recognition and normal relations with the Arabs in the context of comprehensive peace. Today, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas mentions the API on a daily basis.

The Israeli government never responded to either the Fez Initiative or the API. In 2013, Israelis built more settlements than ever before, and this spring the peace talks launched and guided by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry foundered because of the relentless drive to build more and more homes in Palestine.

How is it possible that while my friend and hero Yasser Arafat, and indeed much of the Arab and Muslim world, long ago accepted the basic framework of a two-state solution, the occupation is far more entrenched today than when the Oslo Accords were signed some 20 years ago on the White House lawn?

A main cause of the failure of so many well-intentioned peace initiatives, including the latest round of talks, is the very reason the man in my story never got his money back: The “honest brokers” all too often agree with our occupiers that the destructive spread of settlements is on “disputed,” not occupied, land; and that we and the Israelis must “work out” our differences across a table. With the negotiation rules thus rigged, justice will forever remain elusive.

No conflict in modern history has decimated as many forests for newsprint, books and doctoral dissertations as ours. But scant attention has been paid to this linguistic sleight of hand that turns a military occupation into a quarrel over “disputed” land. When the Republican Governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, recently dared to utter the words “occupied territories” in a speech, he was so pilloried by incensed supporters of Israel that he had to apologize.

There will be no peace so long as this fundamental truth is not told – that since 1967 we Palestinians have been occupied by the Israel Defense Forces, controlled by Israeli government planners and watched over by the Shin Bet security service. We do not need an “honest broker” refereeing our “dispute.” We need an honest judge to deliver justice.

One option for Palestinians, of course, is to turn to the United Nations. The Security Council, which created Israel in 1947, has condemned settlement activity 15 times over the years. The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court can also be used to compel Israel into obeying international law. The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, tearing a page from the anti-apartheid movement of the 1980s, can simultaneously call for boycotts against the Israeli economy and culture.

These are all likely courses if we cannot find a positive and just formula between the parties.

Crown Prince Fahd was visionary by recognizing in 1981 that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict must be solved in a multinational, win-win manner. In the spirit of the Fez Initiative and the API, the world community should make it clear what the end game must look like: two states based on the 1967 borders, two capitals in Jerusalem, and a just and mutually agreed-upon solution to the refugee problem in accordance with UN Resolution 194. In exchange, both now and in the future, Israel will enjoy full peace and security with its neighbors and 57 Arab and Islamic countries. The bonus to Israel is beyond imagination.

Once our two governments return to the negotiation table and conclude a peace agreement, we want to live in harmony with the Israelis. Even more so, we want Israelis to contribute to our nation-building through their know-how in science, IT, entrepreneurship, health care and the humanities.

This is what the future can hold if wise men once again return to the Holy Land.

Homeless/Stolen/Violence June 10, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Israel, Gaza & Middle East.
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by Abby Zimet

Powerful new ads asking, “Does Israel want peace…or land?” now up in Boston’s subway stations are eliciting the usual hysterical claims of “race-based Jew hatred” from the right-wing likes of Pam Geller. But the Jewish-founded Ads Against Apartheid, which sponsored the ad campaign, says they “simply state the facts,” with citations – eg: that Israel has demolished over 25,000 Palestinian homes, built 150 Jewish settlements, killed a Palestinian child every four days since 2000.

“If the ads are shocking, that’s because the reality on the ground is shocking…..These ads show what Israel’s occupation and apartheid really look like, and it is important for Americans to see that.”

An Opportunity to Survive: Someone Has Made A Bulletproof Blanket For Your Kids Because This Is What We’ve Come To June 10, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Gun Control/Violence.
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Roger’s note: I am reminded of the drop drills we had when I was in elementary school in the immediate post WWII years.  In case of atomic attack, the teacher would yell “DROP!” and we would dive under our desks.  This surely would have protected us from an atomic blast.  Security is not a matter of weapons or bullet proof accessories, but rather a just social and economic system.  Of course, fear mongering is good and profitable  for enterprising capitalists such as the one described here.  So, hurry, get your bullet proof blanket today, supplies are limited!  And pick up your automatic weapon and rounds while you’re at it!

When will they ever learn?

 

by Abby Zimet

An Oklahoma podiatrist has designed the Bodyguard Blanket, a bulletproof pad offering “an extra layer of protection” against “90% of all weapons that have been used in school shootings in the United States.” In their soft-focus, schmaltzy-music-festooned video, kids romp on “just an ordinary day” until – dark music for “when seconds count” – they dutifully strap on their blankets and hunch on the floor under some capitalist’s wet dream of a money-making scheme because that’s all the kids will have thanks to gutless politicians who’ve failed to do anything else to protect them against our national lunacy, and no this is not The Onion.

Comments

  • Things to bring on your first day of school:

    #2 pencils
    3 ring binder
    loose leaf notebook paper
    blue or black ink pen
    backpack
    lunch money
    bullet proof blanket
    bullet proof helmet
    Gun (if you’re a good kid…that way you can kill bad kids)
    a conformist attitude
    manners
    a battle plan
    bullet proof vest

    Lesson of the day: The pledge of Allegiance and American exceptionalism

    • …and be sure to wear clean underwear, just in case.
      …and make sure you hug Mommy before leaving for the school bus.
      …and feed the dog because you never know when or if you will be coming back home.

  • Looks like WE are back to ‘duck-and-cover’. This time the enemy is us.
    By the time the kids are in second grade they will have PTSD.

U.S. Aid Wrapped In A Body Bag: Suing the Drone Makers May 24, 2014

Posted by rogerhollander in Israel, Gaza & Middle East, War, War on Terror.
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Roger’s note: What will it take to end this barbarism???

by Abby Zimet, Common Dreams

images

Mohammed Al-Qawli, an educational consultant in Yemen, remains haunted by the day in January 2013 he spent hours trying to collect the body parts of his brother Ali, a schoolteacher, and his cousin Salim, a student, both “accidentally” killed in a U.S. drone strike. Now Al-Qawli and human rights group Reprieve are mounting a legal challenge against the U.K government for failing to investigate violations of international law by communications giant British Telecom, which is allegedly facilitating U.S. strikes that have killed perhaps 1,000 Yemenis.

In April, Al-Qawli also launched the National Organization for Drone Victims in memory of his brother to allow “the voices of victims” to be heard and to work to end an ongoing U.S. targeted killing program that has had a “devastating” effect on communities throughout Yemen. While “Ali al-Qawli the schoolteacher has left us,” he notes, “his tremendous legacy of love, passion and hope remains…I hope that the American people (will) stand against the violent actions of their Nobel Peace Prize–winning president and join us in demanding that the U.S. government stop its blind killing of hundreds of innocent people.”

“I’d heard that the United States of America was sending support to Yemen, but for a long time I did not know what that meant. Now I can see it firsthand. I have received U.S. gifts and U.S. aid, wrapped in a body bag. These explosive fragments kill Yemenis, destroy their spirits, burn their bodies and only further empower the militants. The U.S. and Yemeni governments killed a young man who strongly opposed terrorism and tried to bring change through education – the very same things they purport to want themselves. I want to know why.”

  • I just don’t understand why more people don’t see this drone policy as horrifically wrong, with such heartbreaking results:

    “I’d heard that the United States of America was sending support to Yemen, but for a long time I did not know what that meant. Now I can see it firsthand. I have received U.S. gifts and U.S. aid, wrapped in a body bag. These explosive fragments kill Yemenis, destroy their spirits, burn their bodies and only further empower the militants. The U.S. and Yemeni governments killed a young man who strongly opposed terrorism and tried to bring change through education – the very same things they purport to want themselves. I want to know why.”

  • With every drone strike our government implements abroad, we lose a little more of our freedom at home.

     
    • “With every drone strike our government implements abroad, we lose a little more of our freedom at home.” I’m not going to argue with whether your statement is true or not. I am just going to point out that the reason for not killing other people is not to benefit ourselves but because we actually care about those harmed and what our government is doing to them. In other words, it’s not all about us.

      • With every drone strike, the next one becomes all the easier thus lessening any freedom we would have to influence/restrain TPTB from taking more innocent lives, about whom I wholly agree we care.

  • Imagine collecting the scattered body parts of your brother who was blown to pieces by some stranger in an office in rural Nevada. Imagine the sadness and rage you would feel. This is horrible.

  • what is the difference between a Nazi v2 rocket and a drone? seems to be the same thing just a different time

    • My mother told me when V2’s crossed Holland on their way to England people feared for their lives even though occupied Holland was never the target. Drones do more than kill, they are meant to terrorize entire populations.

    • The Nazi V1 is a more apt comparison to a modern day drone than the V2. The V1 was a fixed wing unmanned aircraft which carried a 1,800 pound warhead. The V2 was a rocket, more similar to current day ICBM (except without the range).

    • The psycho clown pushing the button this time doesn’t have a funny mustache.

  • Obama is addicted to murdering anyone who opposes Obama’s terrorism-engendering war-mongering.

  • Most Americans support our drone warfare, or at least the polls say we do. We can attribute that to the quality of our press, or the quality of the education system, or the combination of distractions and hardships which force people to overlook the ethical questions in favor of economic survival. (Personally, when I bring this issue up, people either agree that it’s very wrong, or don’t know about it. When I describe the US’s drone policy to the uninformed, they’re almost always against it.)

    People support the troops, because we have friends and loved ones who, for whatever reason, make the military into their career – if not one of the huge companies building the bombs, guns, drones, etc. It’s probably because they are made to feel they have no choice but to support the whole system. We are made to feel helpless in the face of obvious oppression.

    It’s not even necessarily a problem with capitalism, because capitalism in it’s very nature has a clear line between public and private expenditure. To the extent that our military has become the jobs program, with massive federal funding and public relations boosts from the media – the boundary between government and business has been nearly erased. In theory, even “mixed-market” economies correct markets which have an imbalance between supply and demand. Our system of military welfare can only be compared to historical empires that slaughtered their way into, well… history. It can’t go on forever, whichever way it goes.

    Where was I going with this? An H.L. Mencken quote, I think, but I forget which one

  • President Obama, Generals and traitorous spies use drone and war created enemies to terrorize US citizens and justify military police occupation of the US itself.

  • USA Lord of Death

  • Since only a psychopathic can murder children, perhaps its time to deliver some justice to the psycho’s and their murder toys.

    Tim

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